Blog Post - October 13th

S. Edward the Confessor| Daily Meditation| Daily Quote by S. Padre Pio| Divine Mercy Reflection


Today in the Latin Calendar we celebrate the Feast Day of S. Edward, King and Confessor. A story about this celebration can be found by Clicking

Here.

Another Story

King St Edward the Confessor was born in 1003 and died 5 January, 1066. He was the son of Ethelred II and Emma, daughter of Duke Richard of Normandy, being thus half-brother to King Edmund Ironside, Ethelred's son by his first wife, and to King Hardicanute, Emma's son by her second marriage with Canute.

He was also nephew to St Edward the Martyr.

When hardly ten years old he was sent with his brother Alfred into Normandy to be brought up at the court of the duke his uncle, the Danes having gained the mastery in England. Thus he spent the best years of his life in exile, the crown having been settled by Canute, with Emma's consent, upon his own offspring by her. Early misfortune thus taught Edward the folly of ambition, and he grew up in innocence, delighting chiefly in assisting at Mass and the church offices, and in association with religious, whilst not disdaining the pleasures of the chase (hunting) or recreations suited to his station.

Upon Canute's death in 1035 his illegitimate son, Harold, seized the throne, Hardicanute being then in Denmark, and Edward and his brother Alfred were persuaded to make an attempt to gain the crown, which resulted in the cruel death of Alfred who had fallen into Harold's hands, whilst Edward was obliged to return to Normandy.

On Hardicanute's sudden death in 1042, Edward was called by acclamation to the throne at the age of about forty, being welcomed even by the Danish settlers owing to his gentle saintly character. His reign was one of almost unbroken peace, the threatened invasion of Canute's son, Sweyn of Norway, being averted by the opportune attack on him by Sweyn of Denmark; and the internal difficulties occasioned by the ambition of Earl Godwin and his sons being settled without bloodshed by Edward's own gentleness and prudence.

He undertook no wars except to repel an inroad of the Welsh, and to assist Malcolm III of Scotland against Macbeth, the usurper of his throne.

Being devoid of personal ambition, Edward's one aim was the welfare of his people. He remitted the odious "Danegelt", which had needlessly continued to be levied; and though profuse in alms to the poor and for religious purposes, he made his own royal patrimony suffice without imposing taxes. Such was the contentment caused by "the good St. Edward's laws", that their enactment was repeatedly demanded by later generations, when they felt themselves oppressed and they formed the basis of the English Constitution.

Yielding to the entreaty of his nobles, he accepted as his consort the virtuous Editha, Earl Godwin's daughter. Having, however, made a vow of chastity, he first required her agreement to live with him only as a sister. As he could not leave his kingdom without injury to his people, the making of a pilgrimage to St Peter's tomb, to which he had bound himself, was commuted by the pope into the rebuilding at Westminster of St Peter's Abbey, the dedication of which took place but a week before his death, and in which he was buried.

St. Edward was the first King of England to touch for the "king's evil" (scrofula), many sufferers from the disease were cured by him. He was canonized by Pope Alexander III in 1161. His feast is kept on the 13th of October, his incorrupt and sweet-smelling body having been solemnly translated on that day in 1163 by St Thomas of Canterbury in the presence of King Henry II.

St Edward's Crown is one of the British Crown Jewels. It is the official coronation crown used exclusively in the coronation of a new monarch. It was made in 1661 for the coronation of the restored King Charles II, as the original crown was destroyed by order of the viciously anti-Catholic extreme Protestant republican, Oliver Cromwell, during the English Civil War.

The crown made for King Charles II is reputed to contain gold from the Crown of St Edward the Confessor.

St. Edward's Crown has been used as a symbol of royal authority since 1953 in the Commonwealth Realms, and can be seen on coats-of-arms.


Daily Meditation

Act of Forgiveness:

Forgiveness is a decision, not a feeling. We begin with God's command, we go through a grieving process if necessary, and when the time is right, we make an act of forgiveness. It is as simple as saying, “I forgive.”

Quote by S. Padre Pio:

Humility and charity go together. One glorifies and sanctifies the other.

Divine Mercy Reflection


Reflections on Notebook Five: 263-326


As we begin Notebook Five, Saint Faustina’s understanding of the Mercy of God should be more alive to you. Hopefully you have a deeper understanding of the infinite love of God and His burning desire to embrace you, free you from the burden of sin, and shower you with His grace.


It should also be clear that God is silent at times so as to strengthen you, purify you and deepen your trust in Him. God’s wisdom and His ways are beyond what we could ever imagine. He is perfect in His love and you must have full confidence in the direction He gives to your life.


As we enter into this notebook, try to believe and live all that you have read so far. It’s one thing to believe it intellectually, it’s quite another thing to believe it with your actions. You must believe in the Mercy of God with your actions. You must let all that you have read take hold of you and direct the way you live. One way to do this is to go back to any reflections that have stood out so far. If something has stood out, be it a particular reflection or a general theme, pay attention to that. The Message of Mercy is broad and all encompassing, but it’s also particular to you. Let the Lord speak directly to you revealing the specific truths that you need to embrace the most.


Reflection 286: Humility, Purity & the Love of God


What is it that is most dear to the heart of our Blessed Mother? If she were to appear to you and offer you her greatest desire for you, what would it be? Perhaps there would be some specific need that she has been made aware of by God for your life, but in addition to this she would most certainly call you to the virtues of humility, purity and love of God. We especially see these holy virtues alive in her life. Our Blessed Mother was humble in many ways. She was The Immaculate Conception, freed from all sin and the most glorious creation of God, yet while on Earth she was hidden and even thought to be a sinner on account of Jesus being conceived before she was married. However, she lived perfect purity in her life which was the source of her most perfect love for Jesus, Joseph and everyone else she encountered. Her purity enabled her to love others with the utmost dignity and respect. Her love of God was also perfect in every way and was made manifest by her total submission to His holy Will. She said, “Let it be done to me according to Your Will.” She meant that and lived it. Allow this witness of our Blessed Mother to call you to embrace these holy virtues so as to imitate and share in her glory and holiness (See Diary #1415).


Reflect upon these three virtues in your life. How well do you manifest them? Think about how they would have been lived in the life of our Blessed Mother and seek her powerful intercession so that you may imitate these virtues which she lived to perfection.


Dearest Mother, I gaze upon your beauty and upon the virtues that radiate from your life. I especially rejoice in your humility, purity and love of God. Help me to imitate these virtues in my own life so that I may imitate your beauty and holiness. Mother Mary, pray for me. Jesus, I trust in You.

2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All