Blog Post - February 10th

S. Scholastica| Daily Meditation| Daily Quote by S. Padre Pio| Divine Mercy Reflection




St. Scholastica

(480-542?)

Both Calendars

Twins often share the same interests and ideas with an equal intensity. Therefore, it is no surprise that Scholastica and her twin brother, Benedict (July 11), established religious communities within a few miles from each other.

Born in 480 of wealthy parents, Scholastica and Benedict were brought up together until he left central Italy for Rome to continue his studies.

Little is known of Scholastica’s early life. She founded a religious community for women near Monte Cassino at Plombariola, five miles from where her brother governed a monastery.

The twins visited each other once a year in a farmhouse because Scholastica was not permitted inside the monastery. They spent these times discussing spiritual matters.

According to the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great, the brother and sister spent their last day together in prayer and conversation. Scholastica sensed her death was close at hand and she begged Benedict to stay with her until the next day.

He refused her request because he did not want to spend a night outside the monastery, thus breaking his own Rule. Scholastica asked God to let her brother remain and a severe thunderstorm broke out, preventing Benedict and his monks from returning to the abbey.

Benedict cried out, “God forgive you, Sister. What have you done?” Scholastica replied, “I asked a favor of you and you refused. I asked it of God and he granted it.”

Brother and sister parted the next morning after their long discussion. Three days later, Benedict was praying in his monastery and saw the soul of his sister rising heavenward in the form of a white dove. Benedict then announced the death of his sister to the monks and later buried her in the tomb he had prepared for himself.

Comment:

Scholastica and Benedict gave themselves totally to God and gave top priority to deepening their friendship with him through prayer. They sacrificed some of the opportunities they would have had to be together as brother and sister in order better to fulfill their vocation to the religious life. In coming closer to Christ, however, they found they were also closer to each other. In joining a religious community, they did not forget or forsake their family but rather found more brothers and sisters.

Quote:

“All religious are under an obligation, in accordance with the particular vocation of each, to work zealously and diligently for the building up and growth of the whole mystical body of Christ and for the good of the particular churches. It is their duty to foster these objectives primarily by means of prayer, works of penance, and by the example of their own lives” (Vatican II, Decree on the Pastoral Office of Bishops, 33, Austin Flannery translation).

Patron Saint of:

Nuns

Daily Meditation

Good Stewards:

Lord, help us to be good stewards of the gifts which you have bestowed upon us. Lead us to those who may need our assistance.

Quote by S. Padre Pio:

Put your trust and love in the goodness of our God.

Divine Mercy Reflection

Reflections on Notebook One: 11-111


This first notebook of Saint Faustina begins her private revelations given from the Heart of Jesus to her. She writes in a beautiful and simple way. Though, as mentioned in the introduction to this book, her actual words are not quoted in these reflections that follow, the messages that she received and articulated are presented.


In truth, her messages are those contained in Sacred Scripture and in the Tradition of our Church. And if you were to read through the lives and teachings of the saints, you would find the same revelations. God has always spoken to us throughout the ages. He speaks the one Message of Truth, and He reveals that Message in love. The revelations to Saint Faustina are one new way that God continues to speak and reveal Himself to us, His sons and daughters.


The reflections in this first chapter, based on the first notebook, are intentionally short and focused. They are a way for you, the reader, to slowly and carefully listen to the Heart of God spoken to this great saint. Read these reflections slowly and prayerfully. Ponder them throughout the day and allow the Lord to speak to You the message He wants to give.


Reflection 40: Entering the Heart of Our Lord


A speck of dust or a grain of sand are somewhat insignificant in most circumstances. No one notices one speck or one grain in the yard or even on the floor of a home. But if either were to enter the eye, this grain or speck becomes immediately noticeable. Why? Because of the sensitivity of the eye. So it is with the Heart of our Lord. He notices the smallest of our sins. Often times we fail to see even our most grievous sins, but our Lord sees all things. If we wish to enter into His Heart of Divine Mercy, we must allow the rays of His Mercy to shine on the smallest speck of sin in our souls. He will do so gently and lovingly, but He will help us to see and experience the effects of our sin, even the smallest ones, if we let His Mercy in (See Diary #71).


Look into your soul today and ask yourself how aware you are of the smallest sin. Do you let His Mercy shine within, illuminating all that is there? It will be a joyful discovery when You let Jesus reveal to you what He sees so clearly.


Lord, I pray that Your Divine Mercy so fills my soul that I see all that is within me as You see it. Thank You for Your gentle and compassionate Heart and for being attentive to the smallest detail of my life. Thank You for being attentive to even the smallest of sins that I need to overcome. Jesus, I trust in You.

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