Blog Post - June 13th

S. Anthony of Padua| Daily Meditation| Daily Quote by S. Padre Pio| Divine Mercy Reflection


St. Anthony of Padua

(1195-1231)

Both Calendars

The gospel call to leave everything and follow Christ was the rule of Anthony’s life. Over and over again God called him to something new in his plan. Every time Anthony responded with renewed zeal and self-sacrificing to serve his Lord Jesus more completely.

His journey as the servant of God began as a very young man when he decided to join the Augustinians in Lisbon, giving up a future of wealth and power to be a servant of God. Later, when the bodies of the first Franciscan martyrs went through the Portuguese city where he was stationed, he was again filled with an intense longing to be one of those closest to Jesus himself: those who die for the Good News.

So Anthony entered the Franciscan Order and set out to preach to the Moors. But an illness prevented him from achieving that goal. He went to Italy and was stationed in a small hermitage where he spent most of his time praying, reading the Scriptures and doing menial tasks.

The call of God came again at an ordination where no one was prepared to speak. The humble and obedient Anthony hesitantly accepted the task. The years of searching for Jesus in prayer, of reading sacred Scripture and of serving him in poverty, chastity and obedience had prepared Anthony to allow the Spirit to use his talents. Anthony’s sermon was astounding to those who expected an unprepared speech and knew not the Spirit’s power to give people words.

Recognized as a great man of prayer and a great Scripture and theology scholar, Anthony became the first friar to teach theology to the other friars. Soon he was called from that post to preach to the Albigensians in France, using his profound knowledge of Scripture and theology to convert and reassure those who had been misled by their denial of Christ's divinity and of the sacraments.

After he led the friars in northern Italy for three years, he made his headquarters in the city of Padua. He resumed his preaching and began wrtiting sermon notes to help other preachers.

Comment:

Anthony should be the patron of those who find their lives completely uprooted and set in a new and unexpected direction. Like all saints, he is a perfect example of turning one's life completely over to Christ. God did with Anthony as God pleased—and what God pleased was a life of spiritual power and brilliance that still attracts admiration today. He whom popular devotion has nominated as finder of lost objects found himself by losing himself totally to the providence of God.

Quote:

In his sermon notes, Anthony writes: "The saints are like the stars. In his providence Christ conceals them in a hidden place that they may not shine before others when they might wish to do so. Yet they are always ready to exchange the quiet of contemplation for the works of mercy as soon as they perceive in their heart the invitation of Christ."

Patron Saint of:

Lost items

Poor

Travelers

Daily Meditation

Expressing God's Love:

Pray that each member of your family may always know your love and the love of God. Remember that often your voice and your arms express God's love.

Quote by S. Padre Pio:

For one who is inflamed with divine love, helping the neighbor in his needs is a fever that consumes him by degrees.

Divine Mercy Reflection

Reflections on Notebook Two: 112-188


We now enter into Notebook Two of the six notebooks that make up the Diary of Saint Faustina. The reason for having more than one notebook is simply that when one notebook was filled by Saint Faustina she began with a new one. Therefore, there is nothing particularly different from one notebook to the other. However, for the purpose of this current book of daily reflections, each reflection will begin to be lengthened, starting here with Notebook Two, so as to help you, the reader, enter more deeply into the beautiful mysteries of faith and our shared spiritual life that have been revealed in these writings of Saint Faustina.


You are invited once again to take one reflection each day and to ponder it throughout the day. Try to pray the prayer for each reflection each morning, noon and evening. Allow each mystery reflected upon to become a source of wisdom and understanding for you.


Reflection 164: Longing for the Souls of Sinners


When you see someone with manifest sin, what is your reaction? Many people react with disdain and harsh judgment. When someone breaks the law, we harshly condemn them. When someone lives an immoral lifestyle, we belittle them. Very often, our attitude toward the sinner is merciless. This is a problem. True, we must see sin for what it is and work to oppose it, especially when it affects others. But we must always hold in our hearts a deep love for sinners. We must have a longing for their repentance and always see the innate dignity they have as persons (See Diary #842).


What is your reaction toward the sinner? Be honest and look first at how you react interiorly. We are all sinners. Some sins are more manifest than others and some live sinful lives in an open and obstinate way. But should we allow ourselves to condemn them? We must judge an objective action for what it is, but the person must never be judged. This is solely up to God. Reflect upon your attitude toward those with more manifest sins. Pray that instead of becoming harsh and critical you will long for their conversion and love them wholeheartedly despite their actions.


Lord, give me a heart of mercy for sinners. Help me to love them with a burning love and to suspend my temptations to judge. May I long for all people with Your Heart of Mercy, desiring their holiness. May I also be aware of my own sinfulness and daily seek Your merciful Heart. Jesus, I trust in You.

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