Blog Post - May 7th

S. Stanislaus| Daily Meditation| Daily Quote by S. Padre Pio| Divine Mercy Reflection



St. Stanislaus

(1030-1079)

Latin Calendar

Anyone who reads the history of Eastern Europe cannot help but chance on the name of Stanislaus, the saintly but tragic bishop of Kraków, patron of Poland. He is remembered with Saints Thomas More (June 22) and Thomas Becket (December 29) for vigorous opposition to the evils of an unjust government.

Born in Szczepanow near Kraków on July 26, 1030, he was ordained a priest after being educated in the cathedral schools of Gniezno, then capital of Poland, and at Paris. He was appointed preacher and archdeacon to the bishop of Kraków, where his eloquence and example brought about real conversion in many of his penitents, both clergy and laity. He became bishop of Kraków in 1072.

During an expedition against the Grand Duchy of Kiev, Stanislaus became involved in the political situation of Poland. Known for his outspokenness, he aimed his attacks at the evils of the peasantry and the king, especially the unjust wars and immoral acts of King Boleslaus II.

The king first excused himself, then made a show of penance, then relapsed into his old ways. Stanislaus continued his open opposition in spite of charges of treason and threats of death, finally excommunicating the king. The latter, enraged, ordered soldiers to kill the bishop. When they refused, the king killed him with his own hands.

Forced to flee to Hungary, Boleslaus supposedly spent the rest of his life as a penitent in the Benedictine abbey in Osiak.

Comment:

John the Baptist, Thomas Becket, Thomas More and Stanislaus are a few of the prophets who dared to denounce corruption in high places. They follow in the footsteps of Jesus himself, who pointed out the moral corruption in the religious leadership of his day. It is a risky business: "Let the one among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone..." (John 8:7b).

Quote:

"Men desire authority for its own sake that they may bear a rule, command and control other men, and live uncommanded and uncontrolled themselves" (St. Thomas More, A Dialogue of Comfort).

Patron Saint of:

Poland

Daily Meditation

Contemplative Prayer:

The taste of God in contemplation is more precious than everything else; for, no matter what a man might wish for, it is nothing when compared to this. For when the spirit of a man stands before God and sees His happiness and tastes His delights, then in truth he has attained to paradise.

Quote by S. Padre Pio:

The loving anxiety with which my soul rushes toward God... leaps up to an enormous height in my soul... it seems as if all my bones were dried up by this longing.


Divine Mercy Reflection


Reflections on Notebook Two: 112-188


We now enter into Notebook Two of the six notebooks that make up the Diary of Saint Faustina. The reason for having more than one notebook is simply that when one notebook was filled by Saint Faustina she began with a new one. Therefore, there is nothing particularly different from one notebook to the other. However, for the purpose of this current book of daily reflections, each reflection will begin to be lengthened, starting here with Notebook Two, so as to help you, the reader, enter more deeply into the beautiful mysteries of faith and our shared spiritual life that have been revealed in these writings of Saint Faustina.


You are invited once again to take one reflection each day and to ponder it throughout the day. Try to pray the prayer for each reflection each morning, noon and evening. Allow each mystery reflected upon to become a source of wisdom and understanding for you.


Reflection 127: The Love of God Through Obedience


You are called to love God with your whole heart, mind, soul and strength. But how do you do this? What does an active loving of God look like in our lives? Ultimately, we love God through holy obedience. We must obey His Divine Will above all else. Perhaps that seems like a strange concept, that love of God is best expressed in holy obedience. But it is. It’s expressed in holy obedience because of one simple fact: The Will of God is perfect, perfect for us, exactly what we need, it’s what we were made for, and we must enter into perfect submission to His Will. In the end, the only way we will understand this form and depth of love is by living it (See Diary #616).


How well do you do with the practice of holy obedience? When you think about this, does it inspire you, or turn you off? Holy obedience can be a difficult virtue to embrace and live wholeheartedly. It can be difficult to accept and to embrace as good. Look at your inner reaction to the idea of striving to obey God in all things. If you can rid yourself of any resistance to this practice, you will find great joy in loving God in this perfect way.


Lord, I want to obey You in all things. I thank You that Your law is perfect and, when embraced, completely refreshes my soul. Help me to always love You in this holy way so as to make Your Will my own. In this act, I imitate Your perfect obedience to the Will of the Father. Jesus, I trust in You.

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